Kansas Withholding Form K-4

Differences between Kansas Form K-4 and the Federal Form W-4:

State and federal tax policies and laws differ. To allow for these differences Kansas developed a Personal Allowance Worksheet and Kansas Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate (Kansas Form K-4). You will notice the following benefits with the Kansas form.

  1. It is now optional to claim the "married" allowance rate for married individuals, they may claim "single" to allow for appropriate withholding for two married spouses earning Kansas income.
  2. Dependants are not counted as allowances more than once.
  3. An additional amount can now be specified for your Kansas wage withholding.
  4. Certain credits that do not apply to Kansas filers have been omitted.

The Kansas Form K-4 should be completed as soon as an employee is hired or taxable payments begin. The amount of tax withheld should be reviewed each year and new forms should be filed whenever there is a change in either the marital status or number of exemptions of the individual. If an employee does not complete a Kansas Form K-4, the employer must withhold wages at the single rate with no allowances.

Employee's Responsibilities

A completed withholding allowance certificate will let your employer know how much Kansas income tax should be withheld from your pay on income you earn from Kansas sources.

  • Employees with Kansas source wages hired after Dec. 31, 2007 are required to complete and submit Kansas Form K-4 to their employer on or before the date of employment.
  • The Kansas Form K-4 is optional for employees hired prior to Jan. 1, 2008.
  • Employees should review the amount of tax withheld each year and new Kansas Form K-4's should be completed and submitted whenever there is a change in either the marital status or number of exemptions of the employee.

Department Policy

Traditionally, Kansas has accepted the federal Form W-4 to help employers calculate the Kansas withholding tax for employees. However, due to differences between State and Federal withholding policies the Department of Revenue has Form K-4 for Kansas withholding tax purposes.

Who Will Be Affected
Employees hired on or after Jan. 1, 2008 must use Kansas Form K-4.

Employees hired before Jan. 1, 2008 are not required to fill out Kansas Form K-4 unless they wish to adjust their withholding. If an employee hired before Jan. 1, 2008 wishes to adjust Kansas withholding anytime after Jan. 1, 2008, the employee will be required to complete the Kansas K-4 Form.

Taxpayer Assistance
Kansas Department of Revenue website resources will be posted to assist taxpayers using the Kansas Form K-4. Notifications to professional tax preparation organizations and Kansas employers have been delivered and published.

If you have questions about income tax, please contact:

Taxpayer Assistance Center
Scott State Office Building
120 SE 10th Street
Topeka, KS 66612-1103
Phone: 785-368-8222 Phone: 785-368-8222
Hearing Impaired TTY: 785-296-6461
Fax: 785-291-3614

Frequently Ask Questions

Yes, if an individual is married they can now elect to withhold at the "single" allowance rate to allow a higher percentage of withholding for two income married spouses filing joint. Single individuals should always select the "single" allowance rate.
The Department of Revenue encourages spouses to only claim their dependants on the higher wage earner's allowance certificate. If both spouses claim the same dependants there is an increased risk of owing taxes when filing your income tax return.
As indicated in the Personal Allowance Worksheet section of the Kansas Form K-4, line C, only claim your spouse if your spouse does not work.
Generally, you may claim head of household filing status on your tax return only if you are unmarried and pay more than 50 percent of the cost of keeping up a home for yourself and for your dependant(s).
Yes, as long as no single dependant has been claimed by more than one person at any time.
The Department of Revenue suggests that you make changes to your withholding allowance only in situations that affect your income tax filing status. Changing your Kansas Form K-4 so that it differs from your filing status may increase your risk of owing taxes, and being subjected to underestimate penalty, when filing your income tax return.
To qualify for exempt status you must verify with the Department of Revenue that: 1) last year you had the right to a refund of all State taxes withheld because you had no tax liability; or, 2) this year you will receive a full refund of all State income tax withheld because you will have no tax liability. For assistance in determining Kansas tax liability, please contact the Kansas Department of Revenue at 785-368-8222.
Employees with Kansas source wages hired after Jan. 1, 2008 are required to submit Kansas Form K-4 to their employer. The Kansas Form K-4 is optional for most employees hired prior to Jan. 1, 2008. The Kansas Department of Revenue will notify existing employees (those hired prior to Jan. 1, 2008) who are required to update their withholding.
According to Kansas Law, employers providing wages in Kansas are required to register with the Department of Revenue to submit withholding tax. If your employer is not withholding on your wages, it is important to contact the Department of Revenue to report it. Otherwise, you are responsible to submit estimated tax payments using Form K-40ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals to avoid the imposition of underestimate penalty.
Yes, line 5 of Kansas Form K-4 allows you to enter a specific amount or an additional amount to withhold from each paycheck.
If you have Kansas source income you are required to file a Kansas income tax return. You must also complete and submit a Kansas Form K-4 to your employer. If your income is from sources outside of Kansas and you do not live in Kansas you are not required to complete a Kansas Form K-4.
The amount of tax withheld should be reviewed each year or on or after an event that will effect your filing status. A new form should be filed whenever there is a change in either the marital status or number of exemptions of the individual. Any changes to your Kansas withholding must be reported on a Kansas Form K-4 after Jan. 1, 2008.
Employees with Kansas source wages hired after Jan. 1, 2008 are required to complete and submit Kansas Form K-4 to their employer. The Kansas Form K-4 is optional for most employees hired prior to Jan. 1, 2008. The Kansas Department of Revenue will notify existing employees (those hired prior to Jan. 1, 2008) who are required update their withholding.
State and federal tax policies and laws differ. To allow for these differences

Kansas developed its own Personal Allowance Worksheet and Kansas Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate (Form K-4). You will notice the following benefits with the Kansas form.

  • It is now optional to claim the "married" allowance rate for married individuals, they may claim "single" to allow for appropriate withholding for two married spouses earning Kansas income.
  • Dependants are not counted as allowances more than once.
  • An additional amount can now be specified for your Kansas wage withholding K-4.
  • Certain credits that do not apply to Kansas filers have been omitted.
Print a copy of Kansas Form K-4, complete it, and give it to your employer.
No, you are not required to submit a copy of Kansas Form K-4 to the Kansas Department of Revenue. However, your employer may be required to send a copy of the form to the Department.
For assistance with Kansas Form K-4 please call the Kansas Department of Revenue at 785-368-8222, or visit our website for additional information.
Individuals or businesses who do not file withholding tax are not required to use Kansas Form K-4, however, you need to review your tax filing obligations to avoid unnecessary penalties when you file your tax return.
If you have a large amount of nonwage Kansas source income, such as interest of dividends, consider making estimated tax payments using Form K-40ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals. Otherwise, you may owe additional tax and underestimate penalty when filing your Kansas income tax return.